Maryland Speed Camera Operators Could Be Fined For Bad Ticketing | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Speed Camera Operators Could Be Fined For Bad Ticketing

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A provision in the bill could impose a $1,000 fine for vendors who give faulty tickets.
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A provision in the bill could impose a $1,000 fine for vendors who give faulty tickets.

As outrage grows over Maryland speed cameras issuing citations when they shouldn't, legislators are debating the merits of a bill that would turn the tables on the operators of those camera systems.

State legislators became concerned earlier this year after a confidential audit revealed certain speed cameras in Baltimore were issuing inaccurate citations 40 times more often than officials claimed.

Today in Annapolis, the House Environmental Matters committee heard testimony on bills that would improve existing camera systems, and also cite, then fine the operators of speed cameras when incorrect tickets are issued.

Del. Jon Cardin is the author of one of the bills being reintroduced this session.

"We proposed it last year and it requires a number of things one of them is that there would be a $1,000 fine for vendors that issue invalid of faulty tickets," Cardin says. "This gives the vendors great incentive to make sure that they have done their homework."

Cardin's bill would also prohibit contractors from being paid on a "per ticket" basis in an effort to eliminate so-called "bounty systems" which pay operators more, if large amounts of tickets are issued.

"This shouldn't be a money grab, an incentive to give people tickets," Cardin says. "It should be and incentive to create a system that slows people down, and keeps people in work and school zones safe."

State officials say that so far there's no evidence to suggest that the camera accuracy problems found in Baltimore have spread to other jurisdictions.

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