Virginia Ethics Reform May Not Go Far Enough, Expert Says | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Ethics Reform May Not Go Far Enough, Expert Says

Play associated audio

With former Republican governor Bob McDonnell and his wife facing 14 counts of public corruption, ethics reform was at the top of the agenda as lawmakers gathered in Richmond this year. But, so far, the effort is leaving many with the feeling that more could be done.

"Asking lawmakers to regulate themselves is appealing to the lawmakers, but it may fall short of the kind of reforms that a lot of people would be looking for," says Stephen Farnsworth, professor at the University of Mary Washington.

Farnsworth says an advisory council that would be created by the bill could play an important role by reviewing and posting disclosure forms. But the $250 limit on gifts might be a problem if the limit applies to individual items rather than the total amount that lobbyists can give.

"A gift cap and an advisory council is really the minimum that would need to be done to tighten the rules," Farnsworth says.

For example, Farnsworth says, online reporting could be required so that lawmakers disclose investments and gifts in real time rather than once a year.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.