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Seemingly Random Alexandria Murders Have Residents On Edge

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The similiarities between yesterday's homicide in Alexandria and another that happened in November are raising concerns.

Ruthanne Lodato, 59, was shot to death on the doorstep of her home on Ridge Road Drive. She died after being airlifted to a hospital.

Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook says it's too soon to say if the murder of the music teacher is linked to the death of a prominent regional transportation planner, Ronald Kirby, shot to death in his home, less than a mile away.

"We don't want to in the beginning on an investigation this particular homicide to not give due diligence to the facts around this particular case first before we looks for those kinds of connections," Cook says.

Mayor William Euille says  it's understandable that residents are concerned.

"Certainly, because they've happened and so close timewise and one mile apart behooves all of us to be very cautious and take extra steps in terms of awareness," Euille says.

Police say they have added patrols in the neighborhood, and they are looking for a balding white male with a full gray beard.


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