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Analysis: Family Of Miriam Carey Pursues Justice With U.S. Capitol Police

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The family of Miriam Carey, the unarmed woman fatally shot by U.S. Capitol Police after a high-speed chase last October, filed a federal administrative notice of claim to sue the police for wrongful death. Carey rammed her car into White House barriers and then took off for the Capitol before police shot and killed her. Her family is now seeking $75 million in compensation. David Hawkings, who writes the Hawkings Here column for Roll Call, talks with WAMU host Matt McCleskey about the reaction to the suit on Capitol Hill, and how the lawsuit could unfold.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

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