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Family Of Woman Shot On Capitol Grounds Last Fall Suing Police

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Capitol Hill police officers look at a car following a shooting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013.
(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Capitol Hill police officers look at a car following a shooting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013.

The family of the woman who was fatally shot on the Capitol grounds after a car chase this fall is suing the government.

The car chase left the Capitol in lockdown as senators and tourists scrambled as shots rang out on the Capitol grounds. The incident ended with the fatal shooting of the driver, Miriam Carey. Her infant daughter was found unharmed in the back seat of the vehicle.

Carey's family has filed a wrongful death claim against the Capitol Police and Secret Service, who chased her from the White House to the Capitol. The family is seeking $75 million for what they call the  great loss of a daughter, mother, friend and confidant, according to the New York based law firm representing them.

The sister of the victim, Valerie Carey, filed the suit.

The Carey family is also asking for all the officers and supervisors involved in the shooting to be fired. Those officers were taken off their normal patrols after the incident.

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