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Sen. Mark Warner To Hold Hearing On Target Data Breach

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Target was recently breached by hackers, compromising shoppers' personal information.
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Target was recently breached by hackers, compromising shoppers' personal information.

This afternoon, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) is holding a hearing looking into the data breach at the retailer Target.

It's estimated more than 70 million Americans had their personal information stolen after shopping at Target in November and December. Since then, there have also been cyber attacks against Neiman Marcus and Michaels. The hackers are believed to upload malicious software, which Senator Warner says he intends to explore.

"This is going to be an evolving field. Technology continues to evolve. But the sophistication  of these cyber hackers also evolves," Warner says. "It's important that we work with our retailers and our financial institutions to get this right so that Americans' privacy, financial data, and most importantly their hard-earned resources  are protected."

Warner is conducting the hearing with government officials and privacy advocates at 3 p.m. on Capitol Hill.

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