O'Malley To Hold Rally In Baltimore On Minimum Wage Increase | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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O'Malley To Hold Rally In Baltimore On Minimum Wage Increase

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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Baltimore mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will headline a rally today in support of raising the state's minimum wage.

The governor and the mayor will be joined at the rally in Baltimore by several of the city's faith leaders, including the Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore Denis Madden.

O'Malley has proposed a bill that would raise the minimum wage in Maryland to $10.10 per hour by the year 2016, with the rate then being indexed each year after that to inflation.

Last month, Senate president Mike Miller said he did not believe the bill as currently proposed would pass his chamber, as many lawmakers from outside the D.C. suburbs and the city of Baltimore feel the $10.10 rate is too high for their areas and would hurt the economy. 

Montgomery and Prince George's Counties have already passed minimum wage increases at the local level, taking the rate to higher levels than what the governor is proposing.

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