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Snowy Owl Moves To City Wildlife

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WAMU / Armando Trull

D.C.'s snowy owl could soon be back flying around the District.

The nonprofit group that is nursing a snow owl back to health after it was reportedly hurt by a bus is hoping it can release the bird into the wild within the district once it has healed.

Alicia Demay is the Clinic Director at City Wildlife. She picked up the snow owl from the Smithsonian National Zoo Thursday and doesn't think the bird was actually hit by the bus

"Being hit by the bus, the head trauma, would be severe it would be down and out and lethargic and not acting quite right,” said Demay. “When I first saw the owl, it was doing normal owl things."

She thinks the bus may have just grazed the bird. Demay says the owl was treated for dehydration and shock and then underwent a full examination.

"We found an injury on the left foot" she says, that's a broken talon. “There were also lesser injuries including to one of its wings. Blood test were conducted,” she said. “We wanted to know organ function as well as the blood cell count."

Demay says the bird's DNA was tested to determine its sex and it was also tested for rat poison "carried in the rats and mice it has been consuming." Demay says once the snow owl is fully recovered it will be released into the wild within the District.

The snow owl is not the only animal crashing the party at City Wildlife, "there are squirrels and possums, box turtles, songbirds. The spring will be very interesting with all the babies I'm sure." Demay said.

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