DCPS Looking For Applicants To Join 'Parent Cabinet' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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DCPS Looking For Applicants To Join 'Parent Cabinet'

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D.C. Public Schools already has a Teacher Cabinet and a Principal Cabinet. The school system is now looking for people to serve on a Parent's Cabinet.

A DCPS spokesperson says the Parent Cabinet is a way to share perspectives from schools, address family concerns and let parents weigh in on policy issues. Parental engagement is also a key part of the DCPS five-year plan to improve education.

To be part of the 'Parent Cabinet' you need to answer three essay questions. One about why you want to be part of the group, one about your community connections and one about the top three school-related issues you'd like to discuss.

The applications will be evaluated based on several factors, including where you live, your child's grade level and whether you are willing to share information from meetings with other parents. The school system is open to including prospective DCPS parents as well.

At least 16 members will make up the Parent Cabinet. Applications are due by Tuesday, Feb. 11.

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