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Federal Inspectors Review Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Shutdown

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The winter storm prompted a shutdown at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant.
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The winter storm prompted a shutdown at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant.

Federal inspectors are reviewing last week's unplanned shutdown of both reactors at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission officials are inspecting the plant to get a better understanding of why the malfunctions happened and how plant administrators handled the shutdown that occurred during the winter storm last Tuesday.

Initial assessments by on-site inspectors show that snow and ice affected a ventilation louver filter during the storm causing a short circuit. Several plant systems shut down, including motors for moving control rods and circulating water pumps in Unit 2, triggering an automatic shutdown. Officials say the electricity loss also caused the main turbine control circuit in Unit 1 to malfunction, which led that unit to shutdown automatically as well.

The Nuclear Regulator Commision says the reactors were taken out of service safely and there were no public health or safety impacts.

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