Despite Gains On Tests, Achievement Gap In Region Grew Over Last Decade | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Despite Gains On Tests, Achievement Gap In Region Grew Over Last Decade

Despite recent testing gains, educational achievement in the region remains distinctly unequal — and the gap between low-income students and their higher-income counterparts isn't narrowing.

A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds that while reading proficiency among fourth graders in D.C. increased from 2003 to 2013, the achievement gap increased by more than 30 percent in D.C. and 12 states — including Maryland and Virginia.

In 2003, 90 percent of all D.C. fourth graders rated below proficient on reading. A decade later, that number dropped to 77 percent, a 14 percent improvement, second only to Maryland nationally. But according to the report, by last year 87 percent of low-income fourth graders rated below proficient, while only 39 percent of higher-income students rated the same.

That trend held nationally over the same time period: while 66 percent of all fourth-graders were below proficient in reading in 2013, the percentages differed by race (whites at 55 percent, blacks at 83 percent) and income level (low-income at 80 percent, higher-income at 49 percent). Still, the growth of that gap was more pronounced in the 12 states and D.C. highlighted by the report.

Last November, D.C. officials cheered the news that D.C. students outpaced their counterparts across the country in math and reading improvements on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the Nation's Report Card. But those same scores showed that D.C. still ranked behind all the states in overall scores, and that gains were tempered by a stubborn achievement gap between white and black students.

Early Reading Proficiency 2014

NPR

It's Not Rude: These Portraits Of Wounded Vets Are Meant To Be Stared At

Photographer David Jay says, "I take these pictures so that we can look; we can see what we're not supposed to see. And we need to see them because we created them."
NPR

How Dangerous Is Powdered Alcohol?

Last month, the U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved a powdered alcohol product, making both parents and lawmakers nervous. Some states have already banned powdered alcohol. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Brent Roth of Wired, who made his own powdered concoction and put it to the test.
NPR

Senate Blocks Measures To Extend NSA Data Collection

The Senate worked late into the night but was not able to figure out what to do about expiring provisions in the Patriot Act that authorize the NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records.
NPR

The Future Of Cardiology Will Be Shown In 3-D

The Living Heart Project aims to create a detailed simulation of the human heart that doctors and engineers can use to test experimental treatments and interventions.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.