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Despite Gains On Tests, Achievement Gap In Region Grew Over Last Decade

Despite recent testing gains, educational achievement in the region remains distinctly unequal — and the gap between low-income students and their higher-income counterparts isn't narrowing.

A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds that while reading proficiency among fourth graders in D.C. increased from 2003 to 2013, the achievement gap increased by more than 30 percent in D.C. and 12 states — including Maryland and Virginia.

In 2003, 90 percent of all D.C. fourth graders rated below proficient on reading. A decade later, that number dropped to 77 percent, a 14 percent improvement, second only to Maryland nationally. But according to the report, by last year 87 percent of low-income fourth graders rated below proficient, while only 39 percent of higher-income students rated the same.

That trend held nationally over the same time period: while 66 percent of all fourth-graders were below proficient in reading in 2013, the percentages differed by race (whites at 55 percent, blacks at 83 percent) and income level (low-income at 80 percent, higher-income at 49 percent). Still, the growth of that gap was more pronounced in the 12 states and D.C. highlighted by the report.

Last November, D.C. officials cheered the news that D.C. students outpaced their counterparts across the country in math and reading improvements on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the Nation's Report Card. But those same scores showed that D.C. still ranked behind all the states in overall scores, and that gains were tempered by a stubborn achievement gap between white and black students.

Early Reading Proficiency 2014

NPR

For A Female Banker At The Top Of Her Game, What Does It Take To Stay There?

In the film Equity, investment banker Naomi Bishop navigates the male-dominated world of Wall Street. Screenwriter Amy Fox discusses the film and her research, which included many interviews with women who worked on Wall Street.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

LISTEN: At The DNC, We Asked Women Why They Were Voting For Clinton

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old as 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

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