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Gansler Pitches More Early Voting, Keeping Polls Open For Second Day

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Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler says that if he's elected governor he'll push to extend early voting in the state, including a second day where all polls would be open.

On the 50th anniversary of the constitutional amendment that banned poll taxes to prevent people from voting, Gansler said on Thursday that he wants to give people more time to vote. He would extend early voting in the week before Election Day and have all polls open on the Saturday before the Tuesday election.

Gansler says study after study shows the same thing: the biggest reason people can't make the polls on Tuesday is because of work.

"One of the things we're trying to do is to figure out how to make it easier for people to vote. Obviously the Republicans' interest is to make it less easy for people to vote with voter ID laws and so forth," he said.

Those extended voting days will not be in place for the June primary when Gansler faces Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and Montgomery County Del. Heather Mizeur for the Democratic nomination for governor.


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