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Welcome To The Edge: NPR's Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics Blog

Today marks the start of The Edge, a blog hosting NPR's coverage of the Sochi Winter Games. The Edge is about the journeys Olympic athletes take to get better. From skaters to skiers, no two journeys are alike. But they all end at the same place: in competition. And many of them are fascinating.

As we've prepared for the games that begin on Feb. 6 — in just two weeks — NPR has been following many stories of athletes and equipment, of money and security.

During the 17 days of the Olympics, we'll bring you the most interesting things we see and learn – and we hope you tell us what you're seeing, too. You can follow us on Twitter, and you can also track your favorites on our handy list of U.S. and other Olympians.

We've collected some of our recent stories, to give you a sense of what's to come:

As the Olympics get going in earnest, our stories will come from two main sources: NPR's reporting team that's going to Sochi, and our U.S. staff. That means that in addition to events in Russia, we'll be sure to touch on how we're watching the games and following them online.

If you're still thirsting for stories about the Olympics and can't wait for the Opening Ceremony, here's more of the people and events we've covered in recent weeks:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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