The Bit Of Sportsmanship That Led To Richard Sherman's Rant | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The Bit Of Sportsmanship That Led To Richard Sherman's Rant

You've almost certainly heard about Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman's post-game rant from over the weekend.

As Mark reported, it sparked a great deal of controversy because he got loud and instead of answering questions from a reporter, he screamed at the microphone and looked straight into the camera to deliver a message to San Francisco 49ers receiver Michael Crabtree.

Now, thanks to NFL.com, we have video and audio of the moment that sparked the post-game interview heard around the world.

What's surprising is that Sherman — known as one of the NFL's best trash talkers — showed sportsmanship after he tipped his opponent's pass into the hands of one of his teammates.

Instead of gloating, he's heard telling Crabtree, "Hell of a game," and reaching for a handshake. Crabtree doesn't shake his hand; instead he pushes Sherman's helmet.

As Bleacher Report puts it, Sherman's behavior certainly doesn't fit that of the "thug" some have accused him of being after the interview.

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