NPR : News

The Bit Of Sportsmanship That Led To Richard Sherman's Rant

You've almost certainly heard about Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman's post-game rant from over the weekend.

As Mark reported, it sparked a great deal of controversy because he got loud and instead of answering questions from a reporter, he screamed at the microphone and looked straight into the camera to deliver a message to San Francisco 49ers receiver Michael Crabtree.

Now, thanks to NFL.com, we have video and audio of the moment that sparked the post-game interview heard around the world.

What's surprising is that Sherman — known as one of the NFL's best trash talkers — showed sportsmanship after he tipped his opponent's pass into the hands of one of his teammates.

Instead of gloating, he's heard telling Crabtree, "Hell of a game," and reaching for a handshake. Crabtree doesn't shake his hand; instead he pushes Sherman's helmet.

As Bleacher Report puts it, Sherman's behavior certainly doesn't fit that of the "thug" some have accused him of being after the interview.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.