Changes Could Be Made To Maryland's 'Rain Tax' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Changes Could Be Made To Maryland's 'Rain Tax'

Play associated audio

The so-called "Rain Tax" in Maryland is not even a year old, but some lawmakers in Annapolis are already trying to repeal it.

The General Assembly last year approved a bill that makes the ten largest jurisdictions charge the fee to pay for cleanup of stormwater runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. Republicans started calling the fee the "Rain Tax", and have vowed to get it repealed this year after uproar they say took place when it was first charged in the areas they represent.

When asked if the repeal had any chance to pass, Senate President Mike Miller offered a short response: "No. It's in place. It was passed into law."

Still, the Democrat does think it's possible that some exemptions could be passed this year to prevent non-profits from having the pay the fee.

"They're being treated differently in several jurisdictions. For example, in Anne Arundel County they charge them a dollar. Prince George's County charges a little more. And the city of Baltimore charges the max," he says.

A Senate committee hearing on the measure has been postponed until next week because of the winter weather.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 23

You can see a horror flick or attend a film festival about the events and heroes of the Civil Rights Movement.

NPR

Fruit Recall Hits Trader Joe's, Costco, Wal-Mart Stores

The recall applies to "certain lots of whole peaches (white and yellow), nectarines (white and yellow), plums and pluots" from a California packing company, the FDA says.
NPR

Rubio Interview Sparks Heated Comments On Immigration, Economy

Steve Inskeep talks to Amy Walter of Cook Political Report about the social media response to his two-part interview with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.