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Changes Could Be Made To Maryland's 'Rain Tax'

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The so-called "Rain Tax" in Maryland is not even a year old, but some lawmakers in Annapolis are already trying to repeal it.

The General Assembly last year approved a bill that makes the ten largest jurisdictions charge the fee to pay for cleanup of stormwater runoff into the Chesapeake Bay. Republicans started calling the fee the "Rain Tax", and have vowed to get it repealed this year after uproar they say took place when it was first charged in the areas they represent.

When asked if the repeal had any chance to pass, Senate President Mike Miller offered a short response: "No. It's in place. It was passed into law."

Still, the Democrat does think it's possible that some exemptions could be passed this year to prevent non-profits from having the pay the fee.

"They're being treated differently in several jurisdictions. For example, in Anne Arundel County they charge them a dollar. Prince George's County charges a little more. And the city of Baltimore charges the max," he says.

A Senate committee hearing on the measure has been postponed until next week because of the winter weather.

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