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Kokesh Receives Two Years Probation For Brandishing Shotgun In D.C. Plaza

Adam Kokesh faces over seven years in prison for brandishing a shotgun in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza.
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Adam Kokesh faces over seven years in prison for brandishing a shotgun in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza.

Adam Kokesh, the libertarian activist who brandished a shotgun in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza last July as part of a protest against gun restrictions, was sentenced today to two years probation for violating the city's strict gun laws.

Kokesh, who videotaped the one-man protest, pleaded guilty to the offense in November after over three months in custody, and faced over seven years in prison.

Standing outside the D.C. courthouse this morning, Kokesh says that he was forced into pleading guilty. "In a way I was backed into a corner, it was a difficult situation. It was not my desire for how this case would come out, but at the time it really was my only option."

Kokesh maintains that the protest was worth it.

"I believe self-defense is a civil right, and we need to stand up for our rights especially in America today when we see so many people suffering as a result of not standing up," he says. "Every time we stand up for what we believe I think it's worth it. We've reached millions of people with our message of self-defense being a civil right."

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