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Ocean City Considering A Ban On Swearing

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Signs warning people not to swear already exist in Virginia Beach.
Sandra Cuccia: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cuccia/4533513614
Signs warning people not to swear already exist in Virginia Beach.

Officials in Ocean City, Md., are considering a few new rules they hope will help repair its bruised image as a family-friendly destination. Some of the items being brought to the table could backfire in the realm of public opinion.

Last June, there were a string of violent incidents: robberies, stabbings, and gang-related fights that became a PR nightmare for Maryland's largest beach resort.

And while overall crime is down, some councilmembers say the city needs to repair its family friendly image. So this week, an idea was brought to the table by Councilwoman Mary Knight to erect "no profanity" signs on the boardwalk.

Signs like these already exist in Virginia Beach, although police would have no power to enforce the signage.

Opponents say if the city really wants to repair its image, it needs to go back to the drawing board.

In addition, councilman Brent Ashley, who brought the controversial sagging pants proposal to the table last summer, wants to pass a law that issue citations to people caught tossing cigarette butts out of their cars.

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