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Merger Means Fewer Direct Flights To Small Cities Out Of National Airport

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Fewer slots at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport for major carriers could mean fewer direct flights to smaller cities.
Andrew Deci (http://www.flickr.com/photos/fredericksburg/2345835861/)
Fewer slots at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport for major carriers could mean fewer direct flights to smaller cities.

American Airlines is cutting flights at Reagan National Airport because of its merger with US Airways. The end result could mean fewer direct flights to smaller cities around the country.

In an effort to win government approval for their merger, American and US Airways agreed to give up space at the airport. In return, the federal government dropped an anti-trust lawsuit that threatened to unravel the deal.

Other airlines, including the low-cost carriers such as Virgin and Southwest, will now bid to take over the slots.

Analysts tell the Washington Post that it's unlikely that all of the daily, direct flights to smaller cities dropped in the deal, like those to Islip, N.Y., or Savanah, Ga., will be picked up by the new airlines.

An announcement could come soon on which airlines win the slots at Reagan National.

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