WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Legislator Introduces Bill Criminalizing 'Revenge Porn'

Play associated audio

Virginia lawmakers may soon consider a bill to ban what's popularly known as "revenge porn," the posting on the Internet of naked pictures by an ex-lover.

Albemarle County Prosecutor Denise Lunsford is a powerful woman, and when a former boyfriend posted nude pictures of her on Twitter, she went to court. The pictures came down, but there was no legal penalty.

Now, Delegate Marcus Simon of Falls Church is stepping up to change that. He sees revenge porn as a kind of assault and says that Lunsford is not alone.

"We've got sort of scorned ex-lovers who then use this as a weapon to hurt and embarrass and sometimes cause serious financial harm to their former partner, because they don't like the way the relationship ended," he says.

Simon has introduced House Bill 49, which would allow a sentence of up to one year behind bars and a fine of up to $2,500 for any vengeful person who sells or posts naked or sexual pictures or videos.

"I think they might think twice if they knew they were facing prison time for posting these images," he says.

Some civil libertarians worry this might open the door to further regulation of content on the Internet, but the idea of preventing revenge porn has bi-partisan support.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.