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VIDEO: Springsteen, Fallon Do 'Gov. Christie Traffic Jam'

Being stuck in a horrendous traffic jam is no joke.

Nor is having your potential presidential prospects possibly put into jeopardy by a scandal involving your top aides.

But we do have to say that NBC-TV's Jimmy Fallon has come through yet again with another should-see music video that adds some laughs to the news.

Check out Fallon and The Boss teaming up Tuesday for the "Gov. Christie Traffic Jam" set to Bruce Springsteen's "Born to Run."

If you need to catch up on the "Bridgegate" scandal that Christie is caught up in, click here.

And if you think Fallon has it in for the Republican governor, we remind you that Christie's been on the show to do a "slow jam" with Jimmy. We posted that video here. Springsteen has also lined up with the governor at times — most notably as a member of the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund advisory board.

Meanwhile, Springsteen has a new album: Uneven But Vital, Bruce Springsteen Has 'High Hopes'.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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