WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Maryland To Help Residents Not Able To Get Health Insurance Due To Glitches

Play associated audio

Tomorrow in Maryland state Senate and House committees will take up an emergency bill designed to help residents who tried to sign up for health care on the state's troubled health exchange but were unable to because of technical problems on the website.

The problems with the state's exchange have been an embarrassment to Maryland's Democratic leadership, as the website was a key provision of the Affordable Care Act. The technical problems have kept enrollments far below goals.

Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who was tasked with leading the implementation of the website and other parts of the healthcare reform law, calls the bill fair for those who need it.

"There are a number of Marylanders, anywhere from a few hundred to upwards of $5,000, who because of no fault of their own have not been able to get access to healthcare through the exchange. So we're going to open up the eligibility for the Maryland Health Insurance Plan, which is a high-risk pool for Marylanders who have difficulty getting insurance," he says.

Opening up the eligibility to the state plan could cost up to $10 million dollars, but the bill is expected to pass because without it residents would not have health insurance and could face fines under the federal law.

The exchange has also become a liability for Brown politically, as he is seeking the Democratic nomination to be Maryland's next governor. His opponents have hammered away at his role in the launch.

Attorney General Doug Gansler says the emergency bill is "necessary but a sad commentary on the state of the exchange," while Montgomery County Del. Heather Mizeur says "politics and pride" prevented the rollout from succeeding in Maryland, necessitating the need for the General Assembly to get involved.

NPR

'Deadpool' Is a Potty-Mouthed Splatterfest. A Really Funny One

NPR film critic Bob Mondello says Deadpool goes in deep on its R rating — and has plenty of fun doing it.
NPR

Buy Crop Insurance, Double Your Money

The nation's crop insurance program is really a lottery, says one economist. And it's rigged so that farmers win. In fact, farmers typically get back double the money they pay for premiums.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - February 12, 2016

D.C. Council Member Yvette Alexander (D-Ward 7) joins Kojo and Tom Sherwood to chat about her upcoming fight for re-election.

NPR

Do You Like Me? Swiping Leads To Spike In Online Dating For Young Adults

A study by the Pew Research Center finds the use of online dating sites has mushroomed in the past few years, particularly among 18- to 24-year-olds.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.