Ocean City Community Helps Raise Money For Victim Of Church Fire | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Ocean City Community Helps Raise Money For Victim Of Church Fire

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A woman who endured life-threatening burns on more than 20 percent of her body has been released from the hospital, more than a month after a homeless man set himself on fire and ran into the Ocean City church at which she was volunteering.

Gauze and bandages cover most of 41 year old Dana Truitt's face

She was volunteering at St. Paul's By the Sea Episcopal Church on Nov. 26 when John Raymond Sterner, a 56-year-old homeless man, set himself on fire and ran into the church, setting much of the structure ablaze, killing himself and the church's pastor, David Dingwall.

And while Truitt escaped with her life, she now struggles with the terrifying memories, her numerous wounds, and because she was uninsured, staggering medical bills.

But the Ocean City community is stepping up to ensure that Dana Truitt doesn't have to heal alone, and tonight marks the first of many fundraising events to help her pay for hospital bills and the lengthy rehabilitation process ahead.

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