WAMU 88.5 : News

Fracking Opponents Renew Call For Moratorium In Maryland

Play associated audio

Opponents of the drilling technique hydraulic fracturing, commonly called "fracking," are asking the General Assembly to approve an 18-month moratorium on the practice in the state.

This summer, a commission tasked by Gov. Martin O'Malley will issue its recommendations on how to allow fracking in Maryland. Parts of western Maryland in the state's pandhandle lie atop the Marcellus Shale, the rock formation that companies in neighboring states have received permits to start drilling into for natural gas.

Mike Tidwell, the director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, says the bill would prevent drilling permits from being issued for 18 months after the commission's report is released.

"That gives the General Assembly basically two sessions to look at this," Tidwell says. "We think that is fair. It's not onerous on the industry. We want to get all the facts on the table."

Supporters of allowing fracking say the issue has been studied enough in Maryland and it's time for permits to be issued as has been done in neighboring states.

The moratorium bill failed to get out of a Senate committee by one vote last year.

NPR

'Traveling Pants' Author Tries Traveling In Time

NPR's Petra Mayer profiles YA author Ann Brashares, whose new book The Here and Now follows a young girl and her community who've escaped a terrible future via time travel and landed in our present.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.