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Alexandria Planning Commission To Consider Waterfront Hotel

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Developer Carr City Centers wants to build the Cummings Hotel, a five-story building with 120 hotel rooms, a restaurant and a meeting room.
Alexandria Department Of Planning And Zoning
Developer Carr City Centers wants to build the Cummings Hotel, a five-story building with 120 hotel rooms, a restaurant and a meeting room.

Members of the Alexandria Planning Commission are about to take up a controversial proposal to demolish a 1960s-era warehouse and build a waterfront hotel.

This is the first hotel to be considered under the newly-adopted waterfront plan, which overturns a longstanding ban on waterfront hotels and more than doubles density at three sites compared to what's there now.

On Tuesday night, members of the Planning Commission will consider a 120-room hotel. Several members of the Board of Architectural Review said the project was too large for the scale of Old Town. Now members of the Planning Commission will consider the proposal, but the City Council will have the final say.

Supporters say the increased density is needed to bring revenue to the city  estimated at $420,000 a year in additional taxes. Neighbors of the project in Old Town say it's too big, and that it will destroy the historic fabric of the community.

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