New Details Emerge In Salisbury University Fraternity Hazing Scandal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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New Details Emerge In Salisbury University Fraternity Hazing Scandal

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In Maryland, Salisbury University officials are returning from winter break to a fraternity hazing scandal after a former student came forward with new and alarming claims of brutality during fraternity initiation ceremonies.

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Chapter of Salisbury University has been suspended since October 2012 after an investigation by police and the university's board found the initiation practices by the fraternity which included beating pledges with paddles, forcing them to drink copious amounts of alcohol and making them dress in women's clothes and diapers went too far.

But the family of the former Salisbury University student who originally brought the charges forward says the university didn't go far enough to punish the fraternity.

Justin Stuart is now a 21-year-old University of Maryland student, and he and his family reignited this scandal by taking the story to Bloomberg News last week. The graphic story chronicled Stuart's claims of being hazed in a dark basement in the spring of 2012 and the story quickly went viral, with news outlets across the country and in the UK picking up the piece.

The fraternity's suspension is set to expire next fall.

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