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Metro To Begin Testing Newest Generation Of Rail Cars

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The 7000-series rail cars are expected to go into service in 2014.
Photo courtesy of WMATA
The 7000-series rail cars are expected to go into service in 2014.

Testing is set to begin on Metro's new fleet of modern rail cars.

The newest fleet of rail cars, known as the 7000 series, have arrived and later today Metro is showing them off to leaders from around the area at the Greenbelt station in Prince George's County.

The transit agency says the new cars are much different that the existing ones — they have wider aisles, more comfortable seats, and are considered more durable and safer. They are also more technologically advanced  with security cameras and LCD displays.

In fact, they're so advanced that the 7000-series will not be linked with any older rail cars and will run only in eight-car trains.

Four pilot cars have been delivered to Metro and more are expected to arrive. The cars will be tested for 30 weeks and could be in service by the end of the year.

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