WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

First Snow Of 2014 Brings Wind, Frigid Temperatures

Snow may stick to the grassy areas overnight, but it won't stay long on roads.
Armando Trull/WAMU
Snow may stick to the grassy areas overnight, but it won't stay long on roads.

The first snow of the new year moving into the D.C. area on Thursday night, but accumulation is not expected for most of the D.C. region.

A winter weather advisory is in effect from 6 p.m. Thursday until 6 a.m. Friday morning. The National Weather Service says precipitation will start Thursday evening, shifting to snow overnight. Accumulation is expected to be approximately an inch, but is unlikely to affect the morning commute.

Further west in parts of Maryland and Virginia, accumulation could be between 2 to 4 inches.

Temperatures across the region are expected to peak in the 20s on Friday, with strong wind gusts between 35 and 40 miles per hour.

One concern, according to NBC4's Doug Kammerer, is a potential for black ice on bridges.

The D.C. Department of Public Works is already deploying plows in advance of the storm, though winds and frigid temperatures are expected to be more an obstacle than the snow itself.

"The extremely low temperatures and high winds are our primary challenges to clearing snow from the streets keeping them clear of blowing snow," said DPW Director William O. Howland, Jr. in a press release. "Fortunately, this is a fast-moving system that won’t produce a heavy accumulation."

Farther north, states in the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions are already declaring states of emergency as they prepare for up to a foot of snow.

NPR

Book Review: 'Kinder Than Solitude'

Ellah Allfrey reviews Kinder Than Solitude, by Yiyun Li.
NPR

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
NPR

John Edwards Resumes Career As Trial Attorney

The former U.S. senator and Democratic presidential hopeful is one of three attorneys representing a boy in a medical malpractice case in North Carolina.
NPR

When Parents Are The Ones Too Distracted By Devices

Parents often complain that smartphones keep their kids distracted from conversation. What happens when it's the other way around, when kids can't get their smartphone-glued parents' attention?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.