Maryland Asks Residents To Snap Pictures Of High Tides For Climate Change Study | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Maryland Asks Residents To Snap Pictures Of High Tides For Climate Change Study

Play associated audio
Maryland officials say that photographing areas that flood during high tides can provide information about areas especially vulnerable to major storms or rising sea levels.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mle86/3484239614/
Maryland officials say that photographing areas that flood during high tides can provide information about areas especially vulnerable to major storms or rising sea levels.

Maryland environmental officials are asking residents to snap pictures of high tides along the state's shoreline this week to document the effects of climate change.

Maryland is among several states participating this year in what's known as the "King Tides Initiative."

"King tide'' is a nonscientific term for exceptionally high tides that occur when the gravitational pulls of the sun and moon align.

Global warming is not responsible for the high tides. But Maryland's Department of Natural Resources says photographing areas that flood during high tides can provide information about areas especially vulnerable to major storms or rising sea levels.

NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.
NPR

Japan's Butter Shortage Whips Its Cake Makers Into A Frenzy

For the Japanese, Christmastime means sponge cake. But a nationwide butter shortage has lead to mandatory butter rationing, forcing cake bakers to seek out substitutes.
NPR

Satanist And Christian Holiday Displays To Go Up At Michigan Capitol

The situation has brought controversy — and energized Christians who realized that a planned Nativity scene was in danger of being canceled.
NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.