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Uber Warns About Surge Pricing For New Year's Eve

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Uber might get you a quick ride for New Year's Eve, but it will cost you.
Chris Chester/WAMU
Uber might get you a quick ride for New Year's Eve, but it will cost you.

The luxury car service Uber is warning customers who will be out partying tonight to be ready to pay a lot more for a reliable limo ride.

D.C. resident Tim Shea, 27, will be among the many who emerge from a bar or restaurant some time after midnight, reach for their smartphone, and open the Uber app. And because demand will be peaking, Uber will charge what it calls surge pricing — many times more than the regular fare. He says he'll wait it out.

"I don't really mind staying up a little later if that means I don't have to pay a hundred dollars for a normally $10 trip," Shea says.

Zuhairah Washington is the general manager of Uber in D.C.

"If they open the app and they see a surge multiple that is not appealing then wait a few minutes and try again," Washington says.

Uber has sent out emails and posted on their blog to warn riders about surge pricing before New Year's Eve.

During a snow storm in New York a couple weeks ago, Uber customers — including some celebrities — took to social media to complain about having to pay more than a hundred bucks in some cases for their ride home.

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