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Casino Revenue Boosts Horse Breeding In Maryland

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The state has seen a 13 percent increase in Maryland-bred mares and a 23 percent increase in new stallions for the 2014 breeding season.
Photo courtesy of Maryland Jockey Club / Jerry Dzierwinski
The state has seen a 13 percent increase in Maryland-bred mares and a 23 percent increase in new stallions for the 2014 breeding season.

Members of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association say slot machine revenue is helping boost local horse breeding.

The state has seen a 13 percent increase in Maryland-bred mares and a 23 percent increase in new stallions for the 2014 breeding season, according to the association. 

Breeders are crediting the Maryland-Bred Awards Program, which is funded by slot machine proceeds and allows owners of Maryland-bred horses to earn higher bonuses if they finish in the top three of a Maryland race. The money comes from a portion of revenue raised from slot machine gambling set aside for horse racing purses.

Maryland's horse racing industry suffered declines in recent years from expanded gambling in neighboring states. Maryland now has slot machine gambling and table games like blackjack.

A new casino in Baltimore is scheduled to open next year, and MGM Resorts International recently won a license to build a casino in Prince George's County.

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