Virginia Attorney General-Elect Herring Names Cynthia Hudson As Chief Deputy | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Attorney General-Elect Herring Names Cynthia Hudson As Chief Deputy

Virginia Attorney General-elect Mark Herring smiles during a news conference at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Herring won the Attorney General race against republican Senator Mark Obenshain.
(AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Attorney General-elect Mark Herring smiles during a news conference at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Herring won the Attorney General race against republican Senator Mark Obenshain.

Virginia Attorney General-elect Mark Herring says Hampton city attorney Cynthia Hudson will serve as his chief deputy once he takes office on Jan. 11.

Hudson will oversee day-to-day legal operations of the attorney general's office and provide top-level professional legal services.

She has served as Hampton's city attorney for the last eight years and also as president of the Local Government Attorneys of Virginia, and is on the board of the Virginia Law Foundation.

Before joining the city of Hampton in 1996, Hudson was in private practice for eight years. She has a bachelor's degree from Virginia Commonwealth University and a law degree from William & Mary.

Hudson was honored as one of the "Influential Women of Virginia" in 2012 by Virginia Lawyers Weekly.

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