WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Disease Threatens Boxwoods On East Coast

Scientists at Virginia Tech are urging the public to be careful using boxwood clippings in holiday wreaths and garlands because of a plant disease that is threatening the shrub up and down the East Coast.

The disease is called Boxwood Blight, and is caused by fungal pathogen that turns the normally-emerald green leaves of both American and English boxwood varieties brown and dry.

The spread of the disease is now so wide that horticulturalists at Virginia Tech say the blight can no longer be contained — only managed and they fear it could devastate the boxwood population the same way chestnut blight decimated those trees in the 1930s.

They say people buying boxwood plants or clippings can help by making sure their retailers participate in the Boxwood blight cleanliness program.

And gardeners can help by sanitizing their pruning tools with diluted bleach or lysol disinfectant.

Boxwood blight was first reported in the United kingdom in the early 1990s -- and was discovered in the U.S. in North Carolina, Connecticut and Virginia in 2011.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

'National Review' On How Donald Trump Is Changing The Campaign

The prominent conservative magazine National Review dedicated a whole issue to denouncing Donald Trump. Editor Rich Lowry talks about how Trump is reshaping the state of conservatism.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.