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Jury Rules In Favor Of Police In Retaliation Suit

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A federal jury has for the second time ruled in favor of five black District of Columbia police officers in a retaliation lawsuit.

The jury has awarded the officers $425,000. The officers allege the department retaliated against them after they complained of racial discrimination within their specialized unit.

A lawyer for the officers says the verdict shows that the jury did not accept what he called "excuses" from the police department.

Lawyers for the city denied the allegations.

A federal appeals court threw out a 900 thousand dollar verdict from the first trial earlier this year because of what it said were improper remarks from a plaintiff's lawyer during closing arguments. 


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