After Three Decades In Congress, Frank Wolf Announces Retirement | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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After Three Decades In Congress, Frank Wolf Announces Retirement

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Frank Wolf (D-Va.) served for 17 terms.
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Frank Wolf (D-Va.) served for 17 terms.

In Virginia, longtime Republican congressman Frank Wolf says he will not seek reelection next year.

Wolf first came to Congress in 1980. Even as Washington grew hyper-partisan over his seventeen terms representing Northern Virginia, he maintained the respect of lawmakers in both parties.

Now, the 73-year-old congressman says it's time to step aside and let a new generation represent the 10th congressional district, which stretches from Winchester to McLean.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) remembers working with him from the governor's mansion.

"From regional issues around transportation to a common desire to do a grand bargain around the debt and deficit, he's been as good a representative as anybody that's served in modern Virginia history, and I'm sorry to see him leave," Warner said. "He will be missed."

In a brief written statement, Wolf said he plans to focus his future work on human rights and religious freedom, both domestic and international, as well as matters of the culture and the American family.

Earlier this month, Fairfax County Board of Supervisors member John Foust, a Democrat, announced his intention to run for the seat.

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