Ocean City In Spotlight At Sundance, With Debut Of 'Ping Pong Summer' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Ocean City In Spotlight At Sundance, With Debut Of 'Ping Pong Summer'

Play associated audio

The producers of a movie shot in Ocean City, Md., have announced it will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival this January.

Ping Pong Summer is a coming-of-age story set in the summer of 1985, about a ping pong and hip hop music obsessed teenage boy on a family vacation to Ocean City.

The film wrapped production in the resort one day before Superstorm Sandy hit in October 2012, and producers and director Michael Tully have been finishing and shopping the film ever since.

So when it was announced this week that the film will premiere at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, the excitement level here in Ocean City shot to almost a fever pitch.

Susan Sarandon and Lea Thompson star in Ping Pong Summer, but the comedy also features a number of local youths in both lead and secondary roles.

Ping Pong Summer is the first movie to prominently feature Ocean City on the big screen since the 1986 film Violents Are Blue, which starred Kevin Kline and Sissy Spacek.

NPR

For Native Alaskans, Holiday Menu Looks To The Wild

Thanksgiving menus traditionally celebrate the bounty of late fall. In rural Alaska, that means walrus, moose, fermented fish heads and Eskimo ice cream — salmonberries mixed with Crisco.
NPR

The Native American Side Of The Thanksgiving Menu

The first Thanksgiving was something of a joint venture between pilgrims and Native Americans. Chef Richard Hetzler shares a menu that celebrates the first settlers and the country's first tribes.
NPR

EPA Proposes New Rules To Curb Ozone Levels

The rules would lower the threshold for ozone from 75 parts per billion to between 65 ppb and 70 ppb. They are likely to be opposed by industry groups as well as Republicans.
NPR

In Darren Wilson's Testimony, Familiar Themes About Black Men

Wilson's descriptions of Michael Brown reminded some people of negative depictions of African-Americans in history. Recent studies suggest these perceptions have deeper psychological roots.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.