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In Wake Of Theft, D.C. Salvation Army See Surge In Donations

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There aren't any updates in the investigation into who stole $10,000 dollars from the Salvation Army in Southeast D.C. last weekend, but there has been an outpouring of community support in response to the theft.

The local Salvation Army branch has gotten a series of large donations totaling $48,000 since the theft this past weekend. That sum doesn't include money collected by bell-ringing volunteers.

"This really means that quite a few people will make sure they are able to keep their lights on, will be able to help put food in the pantry for families who are hungry, we'll be able to help children this Christmas seasons to make sure that they will not go without christmas toys under the tree," says Ken Forsythe, a spokesperson for the Salvation army National Capital Area Command.

Forsythe says this is how the money that was stolen would have been spent. Police say they are continuing to investigate the theft.

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