WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Chicken Fingers Being Replaced By Salad Bars At Some D.C. Schools

Play associated audio
The seven salad bars will serve 2,300 students.
WAMU/Armando Trull
The seven salad bars will serve 2,300 students.

A coalition of nutrition and education advocates is introducing a method to promote healthy eating choices by youngsters — salad bars.

The Burrville Elementary School cafeteria in Northeast D.C. has a new salad bar, part of the new initiative to offer healthy food options to students of the city's public school system.

Robert Jaber heads the system's Office of Food and Nutrition Service and is proud to point out the many healthy eating choices now available— everything from kidney beans to corn and romaine lettuce to cherry tomatoes. "This is a tremendous opportunity for the school kids here to have access to food that they might not normally be able to get."

This is one of seven new salad bars that will serve 2,300 additional school kids in wards 7 and 8. They were donated by Kaiser Permanente through a grant to the United Fresh Foundation, and are part of a push to provide fresh fruits and veggies to children who live in food deserts, the economically challenged neighborhoods with little or no access to nutritious and affordable food.

"It's an opportunity for them to make healthy choices about what they eat," explains Principal Tui Roper. "Our students know that health and nutrition go hand in hand with being a scholar."


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.