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Tax Credit Proposal Focuses On Elderly Population In MoCo

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Property tax credits would incentivize the installation of senior and disabled access features.
Ryan Segraves: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryansegraves/3183769172/
Property tax credits would incentivize the installation of senior and disabled access features.

The latest tax credits being offered in Montgomery County are a nod to the county's aging demographics.

The over-55 population is the fastest growing demographic in Montgomery County, and county executive Isiah Leggett doesn't want them to be forgotten as current efforts are underway to attract more young people to the county.

Leggett signed a bill this afternoon that will offer property tax credits to builders and homeowners who add senior and disabled access features to new and existing homes and buildings.

"These features include no-step entrances; wider interior doorways; grab bars around toilets, tubs, and showers; lever handles on doors, light switches, and outlets and wheelchair-accessible levels," Leggett says.

Councilman George Leventhal sponsored the bill, saying the idea came to him after watching his late grandmother and mother-in-law struggle to navigate the brick step entrance to his home.


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