Obamas May Stay In D.C. After Second Term, Says President | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Obamas May Stay In D.C. After Second Term, Says President

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President Barack Obama makes a Thanksgiving Day phone call to a member of the U.S. military stationed overseas, from the Oval Office, Nov. 28, 2013.
Photo by Pete Souza/White House
President Barack Obama makes a Thanksgiving Day phone call to a member of the U.S. military stationed overseas, from the Oval Office, Nov. 28, 2013.

The Obamas may stay in D.C after his presidency.

President Obama tells ABC News the first family may stick around in D.C. when his second term ends in 2016. That’s because the Obamas’ youngest daughter, Sasha, will be a sophomore in high school by then.

The president says in an interview that he’s already asked the women in his life to sacrifice a lot for his political career — and separating his daughter from her high school friends would be difficult.

Both Obama daughters currently attend Sidwell Friends, a private school in Northwest D.C.

President Obama would be the first president to maintain a residence in D.C. since Woodrow Wilson, who lived in the city’s Kalorama neighborhood after leaving the White House.

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