NPR : News

Filed Under:

Workers Killed In Collapse At Brazilian World Cup Stadium

A large portion of a nearly completed soccer stadium has collapsed in Sao Paulo, Brazil, killing at least two people and injuring others. A crane that was installing a large metal structure apparently buckled at the Corinthians Arena, which is slated to host the opening game of the 2014 World Cup.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The workers were putting the final 500-ton piece of the stadium roof on when the accident happened. A giant crane that was lifting the section tipped over crushing the workers. Work has stopped and local reports say it won't resume for at least a month.

"It's the latest setback in the run up to soccer's biggest tournament. There have been massive budget overruns, delays and allegations of shoddy work at many of the stadiums being built or renovated. Over the summer, violent protests broke out in Brazil with many demonstrators decrying the cost of holding the World Cup."

Citing firefighter official Mauro Lopes, The Associated Press says that "at least three people died in the accident." Other news reports have maintained that two workers, not three, lost their lives. The crane had been putting the final section of the stadium's structure into place, according to the AP.

In a statement expressing "heartfelt condolences" to the workers' families, FIFA, soccer's international governing organization, says local and national officials will carry out an investigation into the cause of the collapse.

"We know the safety of all workers has always been paramount for all the construction companies contracted to build the 12 FIFA World Cup stadiums," FIFA's statement reads.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Verdine White On 45 Years With Earth, Wind & Fire

Forty-five years ago, the band “Earth, Wind and Fire” introduced audiences to a new kind of funk--one that fused soul, jazz, Latin and pop. Bassist Verdine White talks to guest host Derek McGinty about breaking racial boundaries in music and how the band is still evolving.

NPR

The Case Against The Shirley Temple (The Drink)

Author and cocktail enthusiast Wayne Curtis wrote an article called "Shirley Temples Are Destroying America's Youth." He talks about why he hates Shirley Temples — the drink, not the person.
WAMU 88.5

What's Ahead At The Democratic National Convention

The Democratic National Convention gets underway in Philadelphia, where Hillary Clinton will accept the presidential nomination.

NPR

Experimental Plane Sets Off On Final Leg Of Its Round-The-World Journey

It's the first time for a solar-powered plane to circumnavigate the globe. Now it's en route to Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates — and you can watch the journey in a live video from the cockpit.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.