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Tell Us About Your Family's Endangered Dishes

If you tuned in to Wednesday's Morning Edition, you may have heard NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris' conversation with Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil of Sacramento, Calif., in the latest story from The Race Card Project.

Ramil told Norris about how as a middle-schooler, she preferred Pasta Roni to her Filipino family's traditional rice. Later in life, Ramil made peace with her Filipino-American identity. And she also became the one in her family most committed to keeping its food traditions, like Filipino spring rolls called lumpia, alive.

Ramil's story got us thinking that there must be a lot of families out there trying, sometimes in vain, to maintain or revive holiday food traditions.

So we want to hear what your endangered holiday food traditions are, and why they're tough to keep alive. Are they labor-intensive? Are the flavors dated? And as couples in your family blend their traditions, do some fall to the wayside that later seem worth reviving?

Email us or tweet to us at @NPRFood. We'll post and tweet them, and some of them may even make it on to the radio.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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