Paul Zukerberg Told To Stop Campaign For D.C. Attorney General | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Paul Zukerberg Told To Stop Campaign For D.C. Attorney General

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The D.C. government has told attorney general candidate Paul Zukerberg to stop campaigning for the position. The defense attorney is battling the city to keep the position on next year's ballot after the D.C. Council moved to delay the election. 

In 2010, D.C. voters went to the polls and overwhelmingly supported a referendum creating an elected attorney general position. That election was supposed to take place next year, but the D.C. Council — in a close vote last last month — approved a bill to delay the election for at least four years.

In response, Zukerberg, a lawyer and former council candidate, sued the city to keep the position on the 2014 ballot and announced plans to run for the seat.

All bills passed by the D.C. government must go through a mandatory congressional review period, and a judge reviewing the lawsuit has said he cannot do anything until the measure officially becomes a law — likely sometime late next month.

In the meantime, Zukerberg has continued to run for the attorney general seat and has been gathering signatures and organizing a campaign.

But the city's campaign finance office has told Zukerberg in an email that he must stop campaigning. He cannot raise or spend money and he says his official committee, Zukerberg for Attorney General, has been scrubbed from the department's online list of active campaigns.

Zukerberg says he thinks he city's move to halt his campaign is political, and he's vowing to fight it.

"We are taking to appropriate steps to keep this campaign going," he says. "I will not give up this fight and I will not be shutdown."

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