Tentative Iran Deal Surprises Local Lawmakers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Tentative Iran Deal Surprises Local Lawmakers

News of a tentative deal being reached with Iran came as a surprise to many on Capitol Hill. Virginia Democratic Rep. Gerry Connolly, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is lauding the deal.

"I think the Iranians for the first time have made genuine concessions that can be evaluated on a daily basis," says Connolly.

Now it's a waiting game to see if the nation will halt its nuclear program as further negotiations take place over the next six months. Israeli officials and critics at home say the deal is a mere smokescreen. Connolly says Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has an untenable position.

"But I think that his position that it has to be all or nothing wrapped up in one initial agreement and only one agreement, is simply not workable," he says. "The United States and Iran haven't even talked to each other in 30 years."

Congress is in recess for the Thanksgiving holiday, but many Republicans are already calling for increased sanctions.

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