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Montgomery County To Vote On Minimum Wage Bill

The Montgomery County Council has scheduled a vote for Tuesday on a bill raising the minimum wage to $11.50 per hour by the year 2016. The scheduled vote comes after the council's health and human services committee recommended the measure by a 2-1 margin, with committee chairman George Leventhal joining council president and bill co-sponsor Nancy Navarro to approve it.

If Leventhal's support of the bill holds by Tuesday, that would give proponents of the bill four votes on the council — one short of what is needed for final approval. If that fifth vote is not found by Tuesday, then supporters could delay the vote indefinitely as some undecided council members have said they would like to see what the Maryland General Assembly might pass when it convenes in Annapolis in January.

A bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour failed last year, but support has been gaining to approve a hike among Democrats who control both branches of the General Assembly. But that wage level is beneath what the councils in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties and neighboring D.C. are currently considering.

NPR

Trump Off Camera: The Man Behind The 'In-Your-Face Provocateur'

Biographer Marc Fisher says Donald Trump has lived a "strikingly solitary life given how public he is." Fisher and his Washington Post colleague Michael Kranish are the authors of Trump Revealed.
NPR

Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

According to interviews conducted before and after Berkeley imposed a tax on sugary drinks, the tax is having the desired effect. People reported drinking 20 percent fewer sugar-sweetened drinks after the tax went into effect.
NPR

Clinton Foundation To Shrink Considerably If Hillary Clinton Is Elected

The Foundation would give up its most recognizable parts, including its major global health and wellness programs.
WAMU 88.5

Why We Open Our Hearts And Wallets For Some Disasters—But Not Others

Flooding in Louisiana has caused tens of millions of dollars in property damage and untold personal misery. But public response has been slow. Join us to talk about why we open our hearts and wallets for some disasters and not others.

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