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D.C. Rolls Out New Traffic Cameras At Stop Signs, Pedestrian Crosswalks

D.C. has long used cameras to catch motorists who speed or run red lights, but now the city is rolling them out to catch violations of more, well, pedestrian violations.

The new cameras — dozens of them posted throughout the city as part of the D.C. Streetsafe program — will dole out fines for drivers who run stop signs, drive through crosswalks while pedestrians are present, speed through intersections as a traffic light is turning red, and get stuck in the middle of an intersection after a light has turned red. The cameras will also catch overweight vehicles illegally driving through residential neighborhoods.

The cameras will be activated on Nov. 23, and through Dec. 29 will only issue warnings to violators. After that, fines ranging from $50 to $250 will be charged, depending on the violation.

As part of their rollout, the Metropolitan Police Department has produced some clever videos equating the moving violations with annoying habits like constantly clicking a pen or letting an elevator door close on someone who needs to get on.

See two of the videos below.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

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