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D.C. Rolls Out New Traffic Cameras At Stop Signs, Pedestrian Crosswalks

D.C. has long used cameras to catch motorists who speed or run red lights, but now the city is rolling them out to catch violations of more, well, pedestrian violations.

The new cameras — dozens of them posted throughout the city as part of the D.C. Streetsafe program — will dole out fines for drivers who run stop signs, drive through crosswalks while pedestrians are present, speed through intersections as a traffic light is turning red, and get stuck in the middle of an intersection after a light has turned red. The cameras will also catch overweight vehicles illegally driving through residential neighborhoods.

The cameras will be activated on Nov. 23, and through Dec. 29 will only issue warnings to violators. After that, fines ranging from $50 to $250 will be charged, depending on the violation.

As part of their rollout, the Metropolitan Police Department has produced some clever videos equating the moving violations with annoying habits like constantly clicking a pen or letting an elevator door close on someone who needs to get on.

See two of the videos below.

NPR

Lisa Lucas Takes The Reins At The National Book Foundation

Lucas is the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which runs the National Book Awards. Her priority? Inclusivity: "Everyone is either a reader or a potential reader," she says.
NPR

The Shocking Truth About America's Ethanol Law: It Doesn't Matter (For Now)

Ted Cruz doesn't like the law that requires the use of ethanol in gasoline. So what would happen if it was abolished? The surprising answer: not much, probably.
WAMU 88.5

The Latest on the Military, Political and Humanitarian Crises in Syria

Russia continues airstrikes in Syria. Secretary Kerry meets with world leaders in an attempt to resolve the country’s five-year civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss the latest on the military, political and humanitarian crises facing Syria.

NPR

Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

Twitter has struggled to attract new users. Its latest effort at rejuvenation is a new kind of timeline that predicts which older posts you might not want to miss and displays them on top.

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