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D.C. Rolls Out New Traffic Cameras At Stop Signs, Pedestrian Crosswalks

D.C. has long used cameras to catch motorists who speed or run red lights, but now the city is rolling them out to catch violations of more, well, pedestrian violations.

The new cameras — dozens of them posted throughout the city as part of the D.C. Streetsafe program — will dole out fines for drivers who run stop signs, drive through crosswalks while pedestrians are present, speed through intersections as a traffic light is turning red, and get stuck in the middle of an intersection after a light has turned red. The cameras will also catch overweight vehicles illegally driving through residential neighborhoods.

The cameras will be activated on Nov. 23, and through Dec. 29 will only issue warnings to violators. After that, fines ranging from $50 to $250 will be charged, depending on the violation.

As part of their rollout, the Metropolitan Police Department has produced some clever videos equating the moving violations with annoying habits like constantly clicking a pen or letting an elevator door close on someone who needs to get on.

See two of the videos below.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

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