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Anthony Brown Pledges To Refrain From Attack Ads In His Campaign

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Another week, and another "pledge" in the race to be Maryland's next governor. This pledge comes from Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who's asking his Democratic rivals to pledge to run campaigns focusing on issues and refrain from attack ads, not just from their campaigns, but from third parties.

The pledge comes a day after Attorney General Doug Gansler's campaign aired an online video attacking Brown's handling of the rollout of the state's health insurance marketplace. And earlier this week, Brown's campaign refused to sign a pledge from Gansler's to reject third party advertising, saying it didn't comply with state election laws. Meanwhile, the other candidate for the party's nod, Montgomery County Del. Heather Mizeur is fresh off a week in which she rolled out her plan to legalize marijuana. She says she's already running on issues.

"I welcome any of the other candidates to run positive campaigns," she says. "Not calling each other out for any kind of negative campaigning. That's the pledge I've made to myself and to voters all along in this race."

But Mizeur says she isn't ready yet to sign the pledge, needing to make sure it complies with the law.

A spokesman for Gansler's campaign calls Brown's pledge "a political ploy to avoid standing up to special interests."

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