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Resurfacing Of 15th Street Bike Lane Wraps Up

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The 15th Street bike lane, freshly repaved.
WAMU/Martin Di Caro
The 15th Street bike lane, freshly repaved.

Two months after starting to lay asphalt, the District Department of Transportation is just about done resurfacing the busiest bike lane in D.C.

From K to Swann Street Northwest, the 15th Street bike lane looks brand new. Fresh asphalt smooths out and covers up old potholes and bumps. Bright yellow and white painted stripes clearly mark where bikes should be, and green hashes warn cyclists about alleyways. Bollards and a parking lane protect bikes from traffic.

Two months after the project began — and one year since ANC commissioner Kishan Putta began lobbying DDOT to do it — the 15th Street bike lanes are just about done.

"It was extremely bumpy before and bikers were swerving out of their lanes into oncoming traffic to avoid potholes and parents were not taking their children to day care by bike because of the potholes," says Putta.

Mike Shenk is one cyclist who appreciates the change. "It was a mess before and now it is fantastic now that the city has fixed it up," he says.

There is a little work left to complete at the bike lane's southern end, between K and L Streets Northwest.

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