Metro GM Apologizes After Especially Bad Week On Red Line | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro GM Apologizes After Especially Bad Week On Red Line

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Delays of more than an hour for some people on Thursday prompted many to turn to Metrobus.
Jay Mallin: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8541868@N03/8386938374
Delays of more than an hour for some people on Thursday prompted many to turn to Metrobus.

Metro General Manager Richard Sarles is apologizing to Red Line riders for the delays this week which are bad, even by the standards of the oft-beleaguered Metro line.

"They suffered extraordinary delays, and for that I apologize," Sarles says.

On Thursday morning, a train headed to Glenmont had brake trouble between the Fort Totten and Brookland stations. Other trains had to single track around it, but then a switch problem led to even longer delays of 30 to 40 minutes.

Yesterday morning a cable dangling from the tunnel ceiling at Woodley Park station caused trains to have to share a track for three hours — killing the morning commute.

"Our response time to this incident in terms of fixing the cause of it was not acceptable," Sarles says.

Sarles says if you got stuck in a major Red Line delay, you can contact Metro customer service for a refund. Mayor Vincent Gray chimed in on Twitter, saying the delays have deeply disappointed and angered him, adding that Metro needs to do better.

The complete text of Sarles' apology, including his explanation, can be found on the Metro website.

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