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Oneida Indian Nation Personally Thanks Obama For Comments On Redskins Name

Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation, has demanded that the Washington Redskins drop the team name.
(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation, has demanded that the Washington Redskins drop the team name.

Native American leaders used a meeting at the White House to thank President Barack Obama for voicing concern about the name of the Washington Redskins football team.

Ray Halbritter of the Oneida Nation, which has led efforts to get the team to change its name, thanked Obama for speaking out. Other tribal leaders responded with applause.

In an interview last month, Obama said that if he owned the Redskins, he would consider changing the name. He said nostalgia isn't a good enough reason to keep a name that offends "a sizable group of people.''

The meeting was closed to the press, but described to the Associated Press by a tribal representative who was not authorized to discuss the private meeting publicly and insisted on anonymity.

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