Virginia's Attorney General Race Could Be Closest In Commonwealth History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Virginia's Attorney General Race Could Be Closest In Commonwealth History

As of Tuesday morning, Mark Herring, the Democratic contender for Virginia attorney general, leads Republican state Senator Mark Obenshain by only 117 votes. That's a slight change from Monday, when Obenshain was ahead — by a mere 17 votes.

By Tuesday afternoon election boards across Virginia have to turn in their final tallies, ahead of a possible recount of the votes. But regardless of who emerges victorious, the race for the commonwealth's top law enforcement official could well end up being the closest in modern history.

The last race to be this tight wasn't long ago — and it was for the same office. In 2005 now-governor Bob McDonnell defeated Democratic hopeful Creigh Deeds in the attorney general contest by a mere 323 votes of the 1.94 million cast, a difference of .01 percent. It took state officials six weeks to recount the votes and certify the hotly contested election.

The McDonnell/Deeds election could remain at the top of the list, though, depending on how the counting of provisional ballots in Fairfax County proceeds today.

NPR

'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of A Hard Day's Night, a spectacular restoration is in theaters and on DVD. The black-and-white photography of the Beatles is gorgeous, and the movie isn't half bad.
NPR

The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
NPR

Rubio Interview Sparks Heated Comments On Immigration, Economy

Steve Inskeep talks to Amy Walter of Cook Political Report about the social media response to his two-part interview with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.