WAMU 88.5 : News

Virginia's Attorney General Race Could Be Closest In Commonwealth History

As of Tuesday morning, Mark Herring, the Democratic contender for Virginia attorney general, leads Republican state Senator Mark Obenshain by only 117 votes. That's a slight change from Monday, when Obenshain was ahead — by a mere 17 votes.

By Tuesday afternoon election boards across Virginia have to turn in their final tallies, ahead of a possible recount of the votes. But regardless of who emerges victorious, the race for the commonwealth's top law enforcement official could well end up being the closest in modern history.

The last race to be this tight wasn't long ago — and it was for the same office. In 2005 now-governor Bob McDonnell defeated Democratic hopeful Creigh Deeds in the attorney general contest by a mere 323 votes of the 1.94 million cast, a difference of .01 percent. It took state officials six weeks to recount the votes and certify the hotly contested election.

The McDonnell/Deeds election could remain at the top of the list, though, depending on how the counting of provisional ballots in Fairfax County proceeds today.

NPR

As Shakespeare Turns 450, 'Hamlet' Tour Makes The World A Stage

Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Weighs Which Roads To Build

Four proposals are on the table for building a new highway to the west of Dulles International Airport, but some are hoping the McAuliffe administration will reevaluate the need for a highway altogether.

NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

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